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Interracial dating effects on children

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The Supreme Court case, which directly speaks to this topic, is Loving v. In 1958 Richard Loving and Mildred Jeter married in Washington, D. and returned to Virginia together as husband and wife. The problem arose in that since 1961 Virginia banned interracial marriages.

The Lovings were prosecuted under a statute enacted in 1924 entitled "An Act to Preserve Racial Integrity."1 The statute said that in Virginia no White person could marry anyone other than a white person.2 The law made it a crime not only to enter into an interracial marriage in the State of Virginia, but it also criminalized interracial marriages outside the state with the intent of evading Virginia's prohibition.3 Furthermore the law stated that children born out of such a union were deemed in the eyes of the State to be illegitimate and without the protections and privileges accorded to the children of lawfully wedded parents. This article compares the history of interracial marriages with that of same-sex marriages.

The focus on these children parallels a new movement on the part of interracial families to join together in local support groups and regional self- help networks, in a time of growing tolerance toward intermarriage as measured by national public-opinion polls. Poussaint spoke of new research findings at a conference titled ''Children of Interracial Families,'' believed to be the first large national gathering to address the subject.

The two-day meeting of 130 experts and members of interracial families was held last weekend at the Riverside Church in Manhattan.

In 1991 a Gallop Poll found that, for the first time, more people in the United States approved of interracial marriages (48%) then disapproved (42%).6 Also the number of interracially married couples in the United States has gone from 150,000 couples in 1970 to 1.1 million in 1994 and the number of children born out of interracial marriages jumped from 460,300 in 1970 to 1.9 million in 1994.7 Furthermore, a Gallop Poll indicates acceptance for interracial marriages is growing. Three major justifications are explained by the author which are: White supremacy, protection of White womanhood, and the prevention of mixed race offspring.

Sixty-one percent of White Americans are more likely to approve of such marriages today, compared to 4% in 1958.8 In addition, according to the U. Census Bureau, one in fifty marriages are interracial which is four times the number compared to 1970.9 Interracial marriages can include the union of Asians, Hispanics, Blacks, Whites, and any other group. The third justification was based on popular belief that children of interracial marriages were mentally and physically inferior to pure White race children.12 These racist beliefs concerning the inferiority of mixed race children were not confined to the uneducated masses.

And by 2050, as those numbers continue to rise, social scientists estimate that one out of every five Americans will be mixed-race.

How will this growing population choose to identify themselves? Read More: The Realities of Raising a Kid of a Different Race To find out, Lauren Davenport, professor of political science at Stanford, sifted data from tens of thousands of incoming college freshmen with multi-racial backgrounds across the country.

Five weeks earlier, the longtime couple had learned Mildred was pregnant and decided to wed in defiance of the law. Upon their return to Virginia, they were arrested and found guilty, with the judge informing Mildred that “as long as you live you will be known as a felon.” The Lovings moved to the relative safety of Washington, but longed to return to their home state.

However, the 1980 census showed there were 613,000 interracial married couples in the United States, a sizable increase from the 310,000 counted by the census in 1970.

In 1980, 1.3 percent of the nation's 49 million married couples were interracial.

While attending law school in England, Ruth met Sir Seretse Khama (then Prince Seretse Khama), the chief of the Bamangwato tribe, who became Botswana's first president in 1966.

Under his leadership, the country underwent significant economic and social progress, while Ruth was a For eight years they lived as exiles in England, until the Bamangwato sent a personal cable to the Queen in protest.